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Friday, October 24, 2014 the Operation Medical team ran a busy clinic and for the New England team, half of the team, it represents their their last day. While the operation room was busy with hernias, Dr. Segil ran GYN clinic and saw lots of simple GYN visits as well as performing two LEEP procedures. Again, the cervical cancer screening project is really starting to take hold. Women coming in for screening and agreeing to treatment is positive. Next month Dr. Julie Bleyenberg will hopefully take it to a new level. Today the team again diagnosed a women with extremely large fibroids – the size of someone who is almost 7 months pregnant. She is 37 years old with no kids but wants to save her uterus for fertility. She was not ready for surgery today but will return in November when the next team arrives. The morning rounds on the operating room patients showed everyone to be up walking, no fevers and functioning well. No one was too anxious to go home and it felt wrong to make them leave, expecially since there is no insurance company requiring them to leave. Everyone will be discharged in the morning and Dr. John Reidell will do post op checks for Dr. Segil next week.

Dr. Segil was able to remove ureteral stents in the morning and the patient was very grateful. He was thrilled they were able to locate all the needed equipment and to collaborate with the local doctors.

The afternoon was quiet so the team walked to an old Voodoo temple, just a hundred yards away from the Hospital. The witch doctor dies several years ago so it is what is called a “dead temple”. The art on the walls is amazing. Next it was on to the local diabetic clinic. The diabetic clinic is adjacent to the guest house where the team is staying and specializes in children with juvenile diabetes. There are two pharmacey students at the clinic for a month in a rotation and have been working at this clinic daily. The students are Chinese and Haitian but born and raised in the Boston suburbs. They educate the children in nutrition and use of insulin. They use clay Zeer Pots as a method to keep the insulin cool when they go home as there is no regfrigeration. Zeer Pots are small clay post with sand in them and another small plastic container in the sand. The result is significant insulation and insulin or other meds can stay cool. The children sometimes spend a day of travel to get there so they can spend the night or the week if they need to for better blood sugar control. The clinic was started just a few years ago with grants and donations and all care and meds for the children is free.

From there the team crossed the street and visited Thesto, one of the interpreters. He build a small music studio in the front of his house and is a DJ and producer at night. He played music for the team and within sseconds the entire group was dancing! It was a perfect let down to the end of the week.

OPERATION MEDICAL WOULD LIKE TO THAN THE NEW ENGLAND TEAM FOR THEIR TIME, TALENTS AND COMPASSION TO HELP THE PEOPLE OF HAITI ON THE MISSION. YOUR EFFORTS ARE TRULY APPRECIATED. WE WOULD ALSO LIKE TO THANK DR. JEFF SEGIL FOR PROVIDING BLOGS FOR POSTING TO THE WEBSITE. IT IS SO IMPORTANT THAT FAMILY AND FRIENDS OF VOLUNTEERS AND SUPPORTERS OF OPERATION MEDICAL CAN HEAR ABOUT ALL OF THE GOOD WORK THAT HAS BEEN DONE.